Indian Style Rifle Sheaths

Indian Style Rifle Sheaths

Native Americans are masters at making useful leather clothing and covers, and have refined their abilities over thousands of years.

Indian style rifle sheaths – Mountain men and trappers were the first whites to wander the wild places of the west, and they soon learned the value of fine leather work from the Indians.

The Mountain Men, Trappers and Scouts either traded, learned how, or took a native wife or “squaw” who made them beautiful leather and fur clothes and covers.

Each Indian tribe has its own unique bead work designs they used to decorate their hide and leather. Experts can tell which tribe and at what period in their history the bead work is from. The Searchers is set in North Texas circa 1868; which leads us to believe that the Indian Style Rifle Sheath that Ethan Edwards carries is Comanche.


All our Cowboy leather has been researched and designed; tried and tested in Old West Shows and at Cowboy Action Shoots.  We try to stay as true to the old west makers as we can, and have incorporated what we found works over years of wear and use.

Classic Rifle Sheath

Classic Rifle Sheath

We promise to make no two custom pieces exactly the same – and our originality and individuality bring clients back time and again to our order catalog.

We have 5 different qualities of fine Indian Rifle Sheaths. All are well made and will give you good service.

Basic :: Good :: Classic :: Better :: Best

We will contact you within one business day of your purchase(s) being made – to confirm the details and make, model, and barrel length of your firearm. Or enter the info in the comments box during checkout.

Buckskin Fact

Buckskin clothing and covers virtually always had a fringe attached. Why is that? Most folks think it was for show – but like most things cowboys used – the fringe on a buckskin jacket, shirt, knife, or rifle sheath had a function – it channeled water off the garment – keeping it dryer – and after it was wet, allowing it to dry faster. Just another adaption copied from the Native American Indians.

Basic Leather and Buckskin Care

When wet – allow the leather to dry naturally at room temperature. If stained use a mild mix of dish soap and water and clean carefully with a clean cloth. Commercial cleansers and chemicals should NOT be used, or they may cause discoloring. In the first year the natural oils in the hide should keep it fairly weather repellent. After we recommend using a spray protector like Tandy, or Mink Oil, which is an excellent protector for leather (NOT buckskin: it will cause matting if used) mink oil will condition the leather and waterproof it to a certain extent. Disclaimer! Supplied as information only – your own common sense should always be followed.

Made to order. Made to last. Made in America by the cowboys and Indians at The Last Best West


Our take on the classic rifle sheath from the great western movie, The Searchers